MAY 20, ’16 HEIRLOOM PLANTS & SEEDS!!!

MAY 20, ’16 HEIRLOOM PLANTS & SEEDS!!!

ONE OF THE BEST THINGS WE ALL  WITH MCS CAN DO —IS EAT HEALTHY CHEMICAL FREE FOOD!!!!!!

SO MANY OF MY MCS SISTERS HAVE ASKED IN E-MAILS— HOW IS YOUR GARDEN DOING????  IS YOUR GREEN HOUSE FULL OF PLANTS???   ETC- ETC -ETC–  WELL———–

I HAVE TO SAY   THIS BLOG POST IS BECAUSE MOUNTAIN MAMA HAS ENCOURAGED ME TO DO A BLOG POST ABOUT OUR GARDEN– & WHAT IS GOING ON THIS SEASON– ETC—-

MOUNTAIN MAMA IS ONE OF OUR MCS SISTERS— WHO LIVES IN THE SMOKIE MOUNTAINS– & KNOWS ABOUT EVERYTHING ABOUT GARDENING & HEIRLOOM SEEDS & SEED SAVING—- ETC—– SHE SEED SWAPS HEIRLOOM SEEDS WITH PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD!!!  I MEAN THIS IS A SERIOUS GARDENER & SERIOUS SEED SAVER———

SO— I WAS BITCHING — MOANING & GROANING TO MOUNTAIN MAMA— THAT THIS YEAR WITH OUR GARDEN AT OUR NEW HOME– THE GARDEN SPOT IS  FULL OF FLOWER STARTS WE MOVED FROM OUR HOUSE IN BRANSON— & NO PLACE TO PLANT FOOD—– & WITH MY HEALTH NOT BEING THE BEST THE PAST SEVERAL WEEKS– & ALL THE RAIN— & GOING BACK & FORTH BETWEEN OUR HOME IN KANSAS & OUR HOUSE IN BRANSON—- I DID NOT HAVE THE SEEDS PLANTED I WANT TO— ETC-ETC—-

WELL MOUNTAIN MAMA  JUST GETS ON HER SOAP BOX TO ME— & SHE SAYS– OK— HOW MANY MCS SISTERS HAVE YOU HEARD FROM IN THE PAST THREE YEARS WHO ARE NOW PLANTING EVEN A CONTAINER GARDEN– THAT DIDN’T EVER BEFORE IN THEIR LIVES— HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE NOW PLANTING HEIRLOOM SEEDS— BECAUSE YOU HAVE BLOGGED ABOUT —GARDENING & GMO’S & HEIRLOOM SEEDS — ETC—— HOW MANY MCS SISTERS  GOT CHICKENS THIS YEAR BECAUSE YOU DID????????  SHE SAID—- SO YOU HAVE NOT GOTTEN SEEDS PLANTED— IT ISN’T TOOOO LATE— & BUY SOME HEIRLOOM PLANTS & WHAT THE HECK HAPPENED TO YOU ENCOURAGING OTHERS TO DO THE SAME—– GET WITH IT GIRL———–

SO   I’M GETTING WITH IT!!!!!!!!!!!    🙂

HERE IS MY LIST OF HEIRLOOM PLANTS GARY & I HAVE BOUGHT THAT WILL BE CONTAINER PLANTS———-

ALL ARE HEIRLOOM PLANTS—–

A BIG TOMATO PLANT THAT IS  CHEROKEE PURPLE TOMATO

Heirloom. Cherokee Purple seeds, originating from Tennessee, are thought to have been passed down from Native Americans of the Cherokee tribe. This heirloom tomato variety consistently ranks very high in taste tests. Slice Cherokee Purple tomato for rich, dark color and unmatched sweet, rich taste on sandwiches or in salads. The tomato is a beautiful dusky pink with a deep, rich-red interior. Cherokee Purple grows well in most regions of the U.S. Let the fruit ripen on the vine for the best flavor. This one is a consistent taste test winner at tomato fests around the country. For an heirloom, it is a good producer. In our Alabama test garden, where conditions are ideal and the season is long, we harvest and average of 20 or more fruits from each plant. Vigorous vines benefit from strong staking or caging.

(80 days. An old Cherokee Indian heirloom, pre-1890 variety; beautiful deep dusky purple-pink color, superb sweet flavor, and very large sized fruit. Try this one for real old-time tomato flavor. My favorite dark tomato!)

GOLDEN JUBILEE TOMATO

Heirloom. First introduced in 1943 as an All-America Selection, Jubilee bears large tomatoes with very meaty, thick-walled interiors and mild flavor. The globe-shaped, golden-orange fruit is similar to Sunray. Has meaty, thick walls and few seeds. High yielding. The indeterminate vines benefit from strong staking or caging, and are widely adapted throughout the US except in northernmost portions. Resistant to alternaria stem canker (A).

70-80 days. A very popular orange variety; fine, sweet, mild flavor; good size and yield. An old standard.

BLACK PRINCE TOMATO

Admittedly, it is difficult to imagine growing tomatoes in Siberia, but this delicious heirloom hails from that very region. This is a fairly early tomato, and one that is more apt to set fruit in cool climates. The small, dark-red, slightly pear-shaped fruits begin maturing a little more than 2 months after planting, no matter where you live. Black Prince has been a very productive heirloom in our test garden, yielding from 25 to 40 pounds of tomatoes per plant over a 3-month harvest season. The flavor is worthy of a chef’s table! Vigorous vines grow best in tall cages.

70 days. An heirloom from Irkutsk, Siberia. The 2- to 5-oz. fruits vary in shape from round to plum- or heart-shaped; the color is a wonderful deep blackish-chocolate brown. The flavor is as deep, sweet and rich as the color. A unique salad tomato; the plants produce a large crop and early; a good tomato for fine markets.

RED BEEFSTEAK TOMATO

Some treats are worth the wait, and the late season heirloom tomato, Red Beefsteak, is a perfect example. Grown for generations for its girth and flavor, it will continue bearing until frost on an indeterminate vine. Moderate disease resistance helps assure a long season of sandwich-sized slices of this meaty red tomato.

90 day.  Also known as Red Ponderosa or Crimson Cushion, it produces large meaty, slightly pleated, red tomatoes on vigorous vines.  It is loved for it’s good sweet flavor and high yields.

BRADLEY TOMATO

Heirloom. An old variety from the University of Arkansas, this indeterminate vine produces pink, mild fruit until frost. Excellent, smooth fruit, with a nice fresh-market quality. Also popular for canning and freezing. Vines benefit from strong staking or caging. Resistant to fusarium wilt (F), alterneria stem canker (A), and stemphylium.

YELLOW PEAR TOMATO

Heirloom. Long, indeterminate vines produce a seemingly endless supply of mild flavored, pear-shaped tomatoes all summer. The tiny tomatoes are borne in clusters. This is one of the prettiest tomatoes in the garden. It’s beautiful in a salad. Bears dependably through summer weather. Vines can grow 8 feet or longer, so give them a tall support or place to ramble.

RUTGERS TOMATO

Heirloom. An old favorite, Rutgers is proven to be highly productive. The large, red fruits have a thick flesh with superior flavor. Strong determinate vines yield a large initial crop followed by several flushes of fruit. This is one of those classic tomatoes that has been used as a parent in the breeding of many other hybrids. Seldom has problems with cracking. Resistant to verticillium wilt (V), fusarium wilt (F), and alternaria stem canker (A).

GERMAN QUEEN TOMATO

Heirloom. This old-fashioned beefsteak has large, sweet fruits that are lower in acid and quite meaty, making them perfect for slicing. The indeterminate vines will grow tall and bear fruit all summer long, so be sure to stake strongly or cage. One slice makes a great sandwich filling!

THEN I BOUGHT SOME SUPER SWEET CHERRY 100’S HYBIRD TOMATO– ONLY BECAUSE I COULD NOT FIND A HEIRLOOM CHERRY TOMATO—-

SWEET CHERRY 100’S HYBIRD TOMATO

Staked hybrid plants produce long strands of 100 or more super-sweet cherry tomatoes, weighing about 1 oz. each and measuring 1″ in diameter. Extra-high in Vitamin C. Plants bear fruits throughout the season. Requires staking or caging.

THEN WE BOUGHT PEPPER PLANTS

A wonderful combination of tangy taste and crunchy texture, sweet bell peppers are the Christmas ornaments of the vegetable world with their beautifully shaped glossy exterior that comes in a wide array of vivid colors ranging from green, red, yellow, orange, purple, brown to black. Despite their varied palette, all are the same plant, known scientifically as Capsicum annuum. They are members of the nightshade family, which also includes potatoes, tomatoes and eggplant. Sweet peppers are plump, bell-shaped vegetables featuring either three or four lobes. Green and purple peppers have a slightly bitter flavor, while the red, orange and yellows are sweeter and almost fruity. Paprika can be prepared from red bell peppers (as well as from chili peppers). Bell peppers are not ‘hot’. The primary substance that controls “hotness” in peppers is called capsaicin, and it’s found in very small amounts in bell peppers. Although peppers are available throughout the year, they are most abundant and tasty during the summer and early fall months.

What’s New and Beneficial about Bell Peppers

  • Bell pepper is not only an excellent source of carotenoids, but also a source of over 30 different members of the carotenoid nutrient family. A recent study from Spain took a close look vitamin C, vitamin E, and six of these carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin) in all commonly eaten foods and found that only two vegetables contained at least two-thirds of all the listed nutrients. One of these foods was tomato, and the other was sweet bell pepper! Bell pepper alone provided 12% of the total zeaxanthin found in the participants’ diets. (Bell pepper also provided 7% of the participants’ total vitamin C intake.)
  • If you want to maximize the availability of vitamin C and carotenoids from bell pepper, allow this amazing vegetable to ripen. Recent studies have shown that the vitamin C content and the carotenoid content of bell pepper both increase with ripening. When the vitamin C and carotenoid content of bell peppers increases, so does their total antioxidant capacity, which can be a source of great health benefits. Growers can allow bell peppers to ripen on the plant prior to harvest (which means that you will be able to purchase them in the grocery store in a ripened state). Or, if harvested early in the ripening stage, bell peppers can still be allowed to ripen post-harvest and after you’ve purchased them and brought them home from the market. In one recent study, the vitamin C in not-fully-ripe bell peppers continued to increase during home storage over a period of about 10 days. It can, though, be difficult to tell whether a bell pepper is optimally ripe. Most–but not all–green bell peppers will turn red in color over time, but they may be optimally ripe before shifting over from green to red. A good rule of thumb is to judge less by their basic color and more by their color quality as well as overall texture and feel. Whether green, red, yellow, or orange, optimally ripe bell peppers will have deep, vivid colors, feel heavy for their size, and be firm enough to yield only slightly to pressure.
  • Higher heat cooking can damage some of the delicate phytonutrients in bell peppers. In one recent study from Turkey, the effects of grilling on sweet green bell peppers were studied with respect to one particular phytonutrient–the flavonoid called luteolin. Prior to grilling, the bell peppers were found to contain about 46 milligrams/kilogram of this important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory flavonoid. After grilling for 7-8 minutes at a temperature of 150°C (302°F), about 40% of the luteolin was found to be destroyed. This loss of luteolin from higher heat cooking is one of the reasons we like cooking methods for bell peppers that use lower heat for a very short period of time.
  • Although we tend to think about cruciferous vegetables like broccoli or allium vegetables like onions and garlic as vegetables that are richest in sulfur-containing compounds, bell peppers can also be valuable sources of health-supportive sulfur compounds. Several recent studies have taken a close look at the presence of enzymes in bell peppers called cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases and their role in a sulfur-containing metabolic pathway called the thiomethyl shunt. These enzymes and this pathway may be involved in some of the anti-cancer benefits that bell pepper has shown in some animal and lab studies. They may serve as the basis for some of the anti-cancer benefits shown by green, yellow, red and orange vegetable intake in recent studies, including a recent study on risk reduction for gastric cancer and esophageal cancer.

RED BELL PEPPER

GREEN BELL PEPPER

YELLOW BELL PEPPER

BANANA PEPPER

PIMIENTO PEPPER

AND MOUNTAIN MAMA SUGGESTED CREEPING ROSEMARY FOR GROUND COVER-— COULD NOT FIND ANY— BUT I DO HAVE MY BIG ROSEMARY PLANT THAT I HAVE BEEN TAKING STARTS OF OF FOR MORE OF MY HERB GARDEN—-

BUT WHAT WE DID FIND FOR GROUND COVER WAS– LEMON THYME

A favorite of all thymes, lemon thyme is great in the garden and the kitchen. Easy to grow. Although it looks like German thyme (or English thyme), it definitely tastes and smells like lemon. Use lemon thyme in any recipe that calls for lemon, including marinades. Lemon thyme grows vigorously, so you can trim back to keep neat and compact and enjoy the trimmings! The glossy green foliage is easily sheared into a tiny hedge if you are looking to create a traditional knot garden. Evergreen in zones 8 and 9. This is a really pretty thyme that our customers brag about for its vigor and size. Lemon thyme looks great in a pot.

RED THYME

Fast spreading Creeping Thyme is one of the best low-growing drought tolerant groundcovers for sunny & dry spots.

Creeping thyme will crowd out unwanted weeds and thrive in poor soil where other groundcovers fail. An ideal lawn substitute for small spaces.

A low growing mat reaching only 1″ tall. This no-fuss groundcovers requires little water, revels in heat & humidity and requires no maintenance.

Soft green foliage releases a perfume when stroked or walked on that will stir the senses and linger throughout the garden air. Hundreds of pink flowers are also fragrant and bloom in early summer.

Plant around stepping stones, over boulders, in stone paths, or let it spill throughout your perennial border.

The only requirement this deer-proof and hardy ground cover has is a sunny spot with good drainage.

Thymus Coccineus makes the perfect colorful & fragrant carpet for planting at the base of Sedums, KnockOut Roses, Ornamental Grasses.

Special Features: Blooms First Year, Butterfly Lovers, Cold Hardy, Deer Resistant, Drought Tolerant, Easy Care, Fast Growing, Fragrance, Heat Tolerant, Tolerates Foot Traffic

RED THYME

RED THYME— ABOVE IN PICTURE———

I HAVE SEVERAL KINDS OF MINT– THAT I MOVED STARTS WITH ME— CHO MINT– APPLE MINT– PEPPERMINT– SPEARMINT– ETC—-

I WILL BE PLANING ALL KINDS OF HERBS WITH SEEDS——

AND SOMETHING NEW I’M PLANTING THIS YEAR IS:

HEIRLOOM ARMENIAN CUCUMBER

(Cucumis melo) Light-green, mild-tasting, deeply ribbed fruits. The elongated fruits yield uniform, easily digestible, fluted slices. They are apt to twist and coil growing on the ground, but develop nice and straight when hanging from a trellis. Fruits reach 24 inches long, best harvested at about 18 inches. The classic Armenian “Cucumber” which is actually a melon genetically.

CUCK

FRUIT & VEGGIES

VEGGIE

A-MINERALS

eat-crap-feel-like-crap

Garden addiction

ORGANICCHEMICAL SYSTEM

FOODSHADE

NOT A DIET

FOOD

GARDENSILLNESS

bee

DON'T TAKE CARE OF YOUR BODY--

monsanto 5

monsanto 8

monsanto 1

monsanto 3

nutrition

ENOUGH FOR EVERYONE

I HOPE YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO PLANT AN HEIRLOOM SEED— OR AN AN HEIRLOOM PLANT— AN HERB GARDEN— OR EVEN JUST A FLOWER IN A POT——–

 

FOOD

happy every day

BEST KIND OF PEOPLE

THANKS SO VERY VERY VERY MUCH TO SOOOOOOOOOOOOO MANY OF MY MCS SISTERS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD— THAT ARE “MY ONCE IN A LIFETIME PEOPLE”!!!!!!!!!

KEEP CALM EAT LOCAL

CHEMICAL FREE!!!!!!!!!!!!  OR GROW YOUR OWN CHEMICAL FREE!!!!!!!!!

KEEP CALM EAT PLANTS

HAVE A NICE DAY

LATER GATORS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

About sondasmcschatter

I was encouraged to start a blog as I suffer from MCS /multi chemical sensitivities & other health problems & I have helped several hundred others who suffer from MCS set up "Safe Homes" & given them encouragement & HOPE & share information & lots of laughs along the way also. When you choose to use fragrances, chemicals, or pesticides, You are not simply making a choice for yourself, You are making a choice for everyone around you!!!! What makes me an expert on MCS-- not a darn thing-- BUT have lived with it for years-& years- & have learned lots the HARD WAY-- by experience!! And want to give others help & HOPE & encouragement -- as I know there are not many who understand what it is to live with this illness- & ALL THAT GOES WITH IT!!! Internet has been my way of communication with many who we are confined to their "safe homes" all over the USA & other countries!! I have communicated with many HUNDRED by e-mail-- phone & letters & internet forums-- I hope this blog will help in a better way to share laughter-- hope & information!!! As for many are not any longer able to even leave their homes-- & communication is sooo important & sharing & encouragement & GIVING HOPE!!!
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to MAY 20, ’16 HEIRLOOM PLANTS & SEEDS!!!

  1. Christa says:

    Some friends gave us heirloom tomatoes and peppers this year–we are SO excited!!! Defintiely planning on saving the seeds, too. So glad you can do containers!!!! Gardens are amazing. We need to work on keeping bunnies and deer out. And our soil is not the best, but another friend has helped with that, and we are working on a mulch pile. It is amazing, now that I can eat fruits and veg again, how much wonderful organic stems, peels, etc. from me (and the rest of the family’s scraps, too) that can go into the pile and hopefully help next year’s garden. 🙂

    • AWESOME———– I HAVE HEARD FROM HUNDREDS OF OUR MCS SISTERS THAT ARE PLANTING HEIRLOOM PLANTS & SEEDS & SEED SAVING—- ONE OF OUR MCS SISTERS IS HELPING SCHOOLS START TEACHING KIDS HOW TO GARDEN– & FROM GARDEN TO TABLE ALSO HOW TO COOK WITH WHAT THEY PLANT—– ANOTHER MCS SISTER– IS STARTING A FARMERS MARKET IN HER AREA— ANOTHER IS PLANTING GARDENS– BESIDE SIDEWALKS IN INNER CITIES– & TEACHING FOLKS HOW TO TEND TO THE SIDE WALK GARDENS— SO MANY HAVE A GREEN HOUSE THIS YEAR– MANY ARE HELPING WITH COMMUNITY GARDENS— ANOTHER IS PLANTING CONTAINERS & DELIVERING TO ALL HER NEIGHBORS ON HER RESORT— IT IS ALL POSITIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!!! PRAISE GOD FOR THE WONDERFUL POSITIVE CHEMICAL FREE FOOD PEOPLE ARE TEACHING HOW TO GROW & COOK– & ALSO PROVIDING FOR OTHERS!!!

  2. Colleen says:

    I took a break from gardening and opened up to your blog post. My heirloom seeds (carrots, beats, green beans, and carrots cherry tomatoes) are just starting to peek out of the dirt. It’s good timing though, right after I planted them we had frost off and on for two weeks. Can’t wait to eat them. Our Farmer’s Market opens next Saturday. I think we are up to four farmers that are chemical free. It’s tough to get heirloom around here but I figure at least it is going in my organic soil. Great post thanks for the inspiration. 😀

    • LOVE LOVE LOVE ALL YOUR HEIRLOOM SEEDS——– MINE ARE NOT IN THE CONTAINERS YET OR IN THE GROUND YET——BUT I HOPE IF IT STOPS RAINING ENOUGH TO DIG IN THE DIRT THEY WILL BE!!! — THE FARMERS MARKETS ARE STARTING IN THIS AREA— BUT MOST ARE NOT CHEMICAL FREE——– I LOVE HEARING ALL THE POSITIVE THAT OUR MCS SISTERS ARE DOING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THEIR OWN LIVES & FAMILY— & ALSO HELPING OTHERS—- I HEAR FROM SO MANY THAT ARE PLANTING MORE THEN THEY WILL NEED TO SHARE WITH OTHERS! BLANCH OUR MCS SISTER IN TEXAS– HAS THE WHOLE RESORT SHE LIVES ON PLANTING CONTAINERS ALL OVER THE RESORT WITH HEIRLOOM PLANTS!!!! HEARING SOOOOOOOO MANY GREAT STORIES— OF COARSE MOUNTAIN MAMA– IS HOME SCHOOLING MANY ON GARDENING– & SEED SAVING– ETC—- MANY OF OUR MCS SISTERS ARE HELPING HOME SCHOOLERS ALL OVER– IN PLANTING COMMUNITY GARDENS– YES!!!!!!!!!! IT IS AWESOME—- EACH PERSON CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE!!!!

      • Colleen says:

        I’VE BEEN VISUALIZING FOR A WHILE — VEG GARDENS AT THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. I WALKED BEHIND THE SCHOOL NEAREST ME AND THERE WERE RAISED BEDS AND TOMATO PLANTS WAITING TO BE PLANTED. YEAH.

      • TOTALLY AWESOME !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOVE IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! THEY MAY EVEN BECOME MORE AWARE OF ALL THINGS HEALTHY & CHEMICAL & SCENT FREE!!!!!!!! WE WILL KEEP PRAYING & VISUALIZING!!!!!!!!! HUGS!!!!!

  3. We planted tomatoes, cucumbers, spinach, carrots, onions, garlic, yellow squash, and several herbs. Well, my husband did and I just watched. 🙂 We always share with our neighbors, and they share whatever they grow with us. All organically grown.

    • YEA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AWESOME—– WE GOT MORE PLANTED TODAY—– EVERY DAY IT ISN’T RAINING & DRY ENOUGH TO PLANT –WE PLANT MORE!!!! 🙂 WE BOUGHT MORE HEIRLOOM PLANTS TO DAY!!!!! AND MORE FLOWER SEED!!!!! 🙂 THE CHICKS GOT MOVED TO THEIR CHICKEN COOP TODAY ALSO!!!!! WE ARE MAKING PROGRESS!!!! SLOWLY BUT SURELY!!!! 🙂

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s